History

Letters from Baghdad

"Letters from Baghdad" is the story of a true original, Gertrude Bell, sometimes called the female “Lawrence of Arabia.” More influential and famous in her day than her colleague Lawrence, Bell was an explorer, spy, archaeologist and diplomat who helped shape the Middle East after World War I and established the Iraq Museum, infamously ransacked in 2003.

Letters from Baghdad

1h 25m

"Letters from Baghdad" is the story of a true original, Gertrude Bell, sometimes called the female “Lawrence of Arabia.” More influential and famous in her day than her colleague Lawrence, Bell was an explorer, spy, archaeologist and diplomat who helped shape the Middle East after World War I and established the Iraq Museum, infamously ransacked in 2003.

Episodes

  • Letters from Baghdad: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Letters from Baghdad

    1h 25m

    "Letters from Baghdad" is the story of a true original, Gertrude Bell, sometimes called the female “Lawrence of Arabia.” More influential and famous in her day than her colleague Lawrence, Bell was an explorer, spy, archaeologist and diplomat who helped shape the Middle East after World War I and established the Iraq Museum, infamously ransacked in 2003.

Extras + Features

  • The End of the Cairo Conference at the Pyramids: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    The End of the Cairo Conference at the Pyramids

    52s

    The end of the Cairo Conference of 1921 is held at the Egyptian Pyramids. In a telegram, Churchill explains the unanimous decision of the conference to install the Hashemite Prince Faisal as the first king of Iraq. Bell wonders about the consequences.

  • A Fandango in the British Press About Bell's White Paper: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    A Fandango in the British Press About Bell's White Paper

    38s

    Gertrude Bell discusses the fandango about her groundbreaking report on the Civil Administration in Mesopotamia presented to Parliament in 1920. The British Press is more astonished that a female can write a White Paper, rather than focusing on her work.

  • Preview: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Preview

    30s

    "Letters from Baghdad" is the story of a true original, Gertrude Bell, sometimes called the female “Lawrence of Arabia.” More influential and famous in her day than her colleague Lawrence, Bell was an explorer, spy, archaeologist and diplomat who helped shape the Middle East after World War I and established the Iraq Museum, infamously ransacked in 2003.

  • Gertrude Bell Arrives in Constantinople: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Gertrude Bell Arrives in Constantinople

    40s

    Gertrude Bell arrives in Constantinople on May 20, 1914. In a telegram, Sir Louis Mallet, the British ambassador, informs his superior about her incredible travels through the Middle East and the value they will have for the British Government.

  • Gertrude Bell Meets the Howeitat Tribe: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Gertrude Bell Meets the Howeitat Tribe

    51s

    On her journey to Hail in 1914, Gertrude Bell meets the Howeitat Tribe, a group infamous for their reckless courage. Apprehensive at first, the tribe allows Bell to photograph them, enabling a friendship to grow.

  • Gertrude Bell Muses About the River Tigris: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Gertrude Bell Muses About the River Tigris

    59s

    In a letters to her parents, Gertrude describes the beauty of the Tigris River at dusk during a hot summer’s night. King Faisal is observing the people frolicking in the water and the fishermen in the round boats (“ghuffas”) are singing sorrowful songs.

  • Questioning British Occupation in Iraq: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Questioning British Occupation in Iraq

    1m 2s

    Gertrude Bell questions the British occupation of Iraq in 1917 shortly after her arrival in Baghdad. While interviewing the inhabitants of the country, she learns that one of the worst downsides of the occupation is the requisition of houses.

  • The Outcome of the Paris Peace Conference: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    The Outcome of the Paris Peace Conference

    51s

    Gertrude Bell is apprehensive toward the outcome of the Paris Peace Conference in 1916. She writes to her former Superior and High Commissioner of Iraq, Sir Percy Cox, explaining her frustrations of the uncertain results and the looming difficulties.

  • A Visit to Babylon: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    A Visit to Babylon

    51s

    Gertrude Bell returns to the archaeological site of Babylon in 1918 to advise High Commissioner Sir Percy Cox on how to preserve antiquities and cease illicit digging of the area. She reminisces about her earlier trip to the site before World War I.

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