PBS NewsHour

February 26, 2024 - PBS NewsHour full episode

Monday on the NewsHour, the latest on hostage negotiations and Israel's plan to evacuate Palestinian civilians before full-scale operations to eliminate Hamas in Rafah get underway. The Supreme Court hears arguments on whether social media platforms have First Amendment free speech rights. Plus, trials show a new asthma drug reduces dangerous reactions for those with severe food allergies.

News Wrap: Trump appeals $454 million judgment in fraud case

3m 56s

In our news wrap Monday, Donald Trump appealed the $454 million judgment in his New York civil fraud case, Ukrainian troops retreated again in the east as Russian forces pushed forward, Alexei Navalny supporters may try to hold a farewell event in Moscow this week and Sweden cleared the final hurdle to NATO membership as Hungary's parliament voted to ratify its bid.

Previews + Extras

  • Israel plans for Rafah invasion amid cease-fire negotiations: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Israel plans for Rafah invasion amid cease-fire negotiations

    S2024 E58 - 5m 51s

    Jordan's king warned against a proposed Israeli raid of Rafah in Southern Gaza after the IDF sent an operational plan to the War Cabinet outlining its proposed invasion. Rafah is now home to more than 1.3 million Palestinians who have fled fighting elsewhere in Gaza. At the same time, negotiations continue over a cease-fire and deal to exchange hostages for prisoners. Nick Schifrin reports.

  • Supreme Court hears cases on free speech and social media: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Supreme Court hears cases on free speech and social media

    S2024 E58 - 8m 50s

    The Supreme Court heard arguments in highly consequential cases navigating First Amendment protections on social media. Tech companies are taking on state laws, decrying conservative censorship online. A decision could fundamentally change the use of speech on the internet. Amna Nawaz discussed the hearing with Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle.

  • Researchers use AI to decipher unreadable ancient scroll: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Researchers use AI to decipher unreadable ancient scroll

    S2024 E58 - 2m 48s

    Ancient scrolls that were buried in volcanic ash during the eruption of Mount Vesuvius are now being deciphered two thousand years later thanks in part to artificial intelligence. Martin Stew of Independent Television News reports from Oxfordshire, England.

  • Afghan activist's memoir details her fight to educate women: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Afghan activist's memoir details her fight to educate women

    S2024 E58 - 6m 12s

    When the Taliban roared back to power in Afghanistan in 2021, education activist Pashtana Durrani had some 7,000 girls enrolled in her organization. The schools were shuttered and Pashtana was forced to flee. She’s now living in exile in the U.S. and still working to educate girls back home. Amna Nawaz spoke with her about her remarkable story told in her new book, "Last to Eat, Last to Learn."

  • Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on politics of Israel support: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Tamara Keith and Amy Walter on politics of Israel support

    S2024 E58 - 9m 29s

    NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report with Amy Walter join Geoff Bennett to discuss the latest political news, including a potential protest vote against President Biden in Michigan, Donald Trump's primary win in South Carolina and Nikki Haley's status in the GOP race.

  • Muslim, Arab Americans hope to send Biden message about Gaza: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Muslim, Arab Americans hope to send Biden message about Gaza

    S2024 E58 - 3m 9s

    A campaign for Michigan voters to boycott President Biden in Tuesday's primary has picked up momentum. Muslim and Arab Americans are hoping to send a clear message to the president after months of frustration with the administration’s handling of the war in Gaza. Geoff Bennett reports.

  • Asthma drug helps reduce allergic reactions to certain foods: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Asthma drug helps reduce allergic reactions to certain foods

    S2024 E58 - 4m 12s

    There's some relief for people with food severe allergies. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine reports the drug Xolair allows people with allergies to tolerate higher doses of allergenic foods before developing a reaction after accidental exposure. Geoff Bennett discussed more with the study’s principal investigator, Dr. Robert Wood of the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center.

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