Culture

ForEveryone.Net

A 33-year-old computer programmer named Tim Berners-Lee changed the world forever when he invented the World Wide Web in 1989. His visionary decision to make it a free and accessible resource sparked a global revolution in how we communicate and participate in public life. After 25 years outside the spotlight, Sir Tim Berners-Lee emerges to tell his story for the first time.

ForEveryone.Net

35m 6s

"ForEveryone.Net" connects the future of the web with the little-known story of its birth and the principles upon which it was founded. Sir Tim Berners-Lee has declared Internet access a human right and has called for an “online Magna Carta” to protect privacy and free speech, extend connectivity to populations without access, and maintain “one web” for all.

Episodes

  • ForEveryone.Net: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    ForEveryone.Net

    35m 6s

    "ForEveryone.Net" connects the future of the web with the little-known story of its birth and the principles upon which it was founded. Sir Tim Berners-Lee has declared Internet access a human right and has called for an “online Magna Carta” to protect privacy and free speech, extend connectivity to populations without access, and maintain “one web” for all.

Extras + Features

  • For Anyone to Use: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    For Anyone to Use

    2m 21s

    From the beginning the Web was designed to be a free and open system for anyone to use. As it quickly gained in popularity, Sir Tim Berners-Lee was faced with a major decision. Should he patent his invention? Unlike most tech pioneers, Tim thought it should benefit all of humanity, so he gave it away. In so doing, the door was opened to everyone to develop a Web that would transform the world.

  • Net Neutrality: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Net Neutrality

    2m 2s

    For Sir Tim Berners-Lee net neutrality is vital to the existence of the World Wide Web. His biggest fear is that some company or government or combination of both might end up controlling the Web. Today the information highway is wide open and free with everyone having equal access. But some people want to turn it into a toll road, block access or censor content. Will we allow it to happen?

  • Preview: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Preview

    30s

    "ForEveryone.Net" connects the future of the web with the little-known story of its birth and the principles upon which it was founded. Sir Tim Berners-Lee has declared Internet access a human right and has called for an “online Magna Carta” to protect privacy and free speech, extend connectivity to populations without access, and maintain “one web” for all.

  • The Son of Mathematicians: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    The Son of Mathematicians

    3m 5s

    The son of mathematicians, Sir Tim Berners-Lee was encouraged to use his imagination. Curious and clever, he became fascinated with computers. Tim soon realized that they were the magic threshold to turning dreams into reality. And if computers could be programmed to make seemingly random associations, they could become so powerful as to rival the human brain. What matters, is the connections.

  • Before the Web: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Before the Web

    2m 18s

    Before the Web computers could not communicate with each other. Each was a closed system. The problem was how to connect them. What if instead of physically connecting computers you created a space to link all the information stored on each of them? Sir Tim Berners-Lee set out to build a platform to share every single piece of information in the world into a single global information space.

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