History

Constitution USA with Peter Sagal

Peter Sagal, host of NPR's "Wait Wait Don't Tell Me!" travels across the country to find out where the U.S. Constitution lives, how it works and how it doesn't, how it unites us as a nation, and how it has nearly torn us apart.

Built to Last

52m 40s

In this last episode, Sagal travels to Iceland, where after the country’s economic collapse, leaders decided to create a new constitution, looking to the U.S. Constitution for inspiration. This prompts Sagal to consider why our own founding document has lasted more than 225 years.

Episodes

  • Built to Last: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Built to Last

    S1 E4 - 52m 40s

    In this last episode, Sagal travels to Iceland, where after the country’s economic collapse, leaders decided to create a new constitution, looking to the U.S. Constitution for inspiration. This prompts Sagal to consider why our own founding document has lasted more than 225 years.

  • Created Equal: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Created Equal

    S1 E3 - 53m 11s

    The high ideals of the Declaration of Independence that “all men are created equal” didn’t make it into the Constitution in 1787. It took three-quarters of a century, and a bloody civil war, before the Fourteenth Amendment of 1868 made equality a constitutional right and gave the federal government the power to enforce it.

  • It's a Free Country: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    It's a Free Country

    S1 E2 - 53m 10s

    Ask Americans what the Constitution’s most important feature is and most will say it’s the guarantees of liberty enshrined in the Bill of Rights. In this episode, Sagal explores the history of the Bill of Rights and addresses several stories — ripped from the headlines — involving freedom of speech, freedom of religion and right to privacy.

  • A More Perfect Union: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    A More Perfect Union

    S1 E1 - 53m 10s

    Breathing new life into the traditional civics lesson, Peter Sagal (host of NPR’s “Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me”) travels across the country on a Harley Davidson to find out where the U.S. Constitution lives, how it works and how it doesn’t; how it unites us as a nation and how it has nearly torn us apart.

Extras + Features

  • Built to Last? - Preview: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Built to Last? - Preview

    S1 E4 - 30s

    Consider the systems that have kept the Constitution healthy for more than 225 years.

  • It's a Free Country - Preview: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    It's a Free Country - Preview

    S1 E2 - 30s

    Examine what most Americans consider the Constitution’s most important feature: the Bill of Rights.

  • State power and the federal government: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    State power and the federal government

    S1 - 59s

    Steve DeAngelo, director of Harborside Health Center - a medical marijuana dispensary - expresses his beliefs that states should have the power to create and enforce their own laws without interference from the federal government.

  • Should the Supreme Court decide controversial issues?: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Should the Supreme Court decide controversial issues?

    S1 - 1m 47s

    Stanford Professor Robert George believes there is no constitutional mandate that would allow same-sex marriage to be legalized. He also shares his belief that the Supreme Court should not decide controversial issues that are not explicitly outlined in the Constitution. Instead, he thinks that should be left up to legislators or to the popular vote.

  • Separate but NOT Equal: asset-mezzanine-16x9

    Separate but NOT Equal

    S1 - 4m 28s

    Visit Little Rock Central High School and learn how the federal government helped integration.

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