America ReFramed

Blurring the Color Line | Jim Crow Laws

In Augusta, Georgia's history, Chinese residents were allowed to enter stores through the front door like white customers. But Black residents had to go to the back door marked for "colored" people. As fellow minorities in the Southern city, why were the Chinese afforded certain privileges?

Blurring the Color Line | Jim Crow Laws

16s

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